Meet the Rosa's Angel Scholarship Winners

Johari 

2018 Winner

An excerpt from her winning essay:

"In my 8th grade year, I joined my schools Leadership Team where we often completed

service projects within our community in order to make our city a better place. I continue to

serve my community in whatever capacity I can and it brings me great satisfaction to know that I

am making a difference. Often we assisted manage school functions and many other projects

such as the Flint Water Crisis and donating handmade coloring bags to the children of the Detroit

Receiving Hospital. Through each of these projects, my most impact occurred the summer before

my senior year of high school. My team was invited to represent Detroit at a youth philanthropy

camp, although we were invited as a group I was asked to be a key presenter at the event. During

my workshop, I taught peers how to "map" their communities and how to properly use their

resources not only did I present this idea but also the introduction of dream boarding service

projects (essentially a picture board that shows your vision). With doing these many of my peers

said they began to view service differently. Currently months later I am still getting messages

and letters from those who attended my presentation about how much better their service

planning has gotten along with the growth of their community partnerships. This has helped

shape me in the way of understanding my role in society. It is my responsibility to care for others

and foster a better future for those who are younger than me by mentoring and sharing

uncommon knowledge for the betterment of communities. Whether it be donating items or

volunteering at hospitals service is the most impactful to me because it helps others believe

things can be better and even promote kindness amongst communities."

Breanna

2018 Winner

An excerpt from her winning essay:

"Before accepting any leadership position in school or in the community, I was told that with leadership comes a great responsibility. At the time I would dismiss it, thinking “this is going to be easy” or “I don’t have much to worry about”. However, after facing adversities, overcoming them, and really understanding what being a leader is, I set that childish mindset aside and took responsibility for the leadership that I accepted. Michelle Obama once said, “You should never view your challenges as a disadvantage. Instead, it's important for you to understand that your experience facing and overcoming adversity is actually one of your biggest advantages.” Throughout my leadership experiences, I have found this quote to be true. From 2014 to 2017, I have held a leadership position in 3 clubs, and in every one of those clubs I have faced adversities.

 One of the most difficult obstacles I faced was this year as Vice President of Red Cross Club. As Vice President, my biggest responsibility is to assist the President as she works on conducting meetings, organizing community service events or donations, and distributing information to members, as well as communicating these thing with the secretary, treasurer, and other group leaders. She and I work well together, so I never had a problem with correctly executing my role as VP, until her mom passed away. She was absent from school for a few months, so to keep Red Cross Club running smoothly and correctly was on me. Initially, I was nervous about stepping up and taking over. I constantly worried if I did something wrong or forgot to do something. Our sponsor assured me that I was doing a great job and had no reason to worry. The pep talk was brief, but it gave me the confidence to execute every single one of Red Cross club’s needs with pride. Our club continued to flourish and we were able to continue to serve the community.

The experience taught me that when dealing with adversity, sometimes all that is needed is a hard work and a little reassurance to get the job done. Perhaps that is a lesson all of us need to learn: in life, hard work is a necessity, especially in adverse times. To me, success is measured by overcoming obstacles and moving forward in spite of them."

Jasmine

An excerpt from her winning essay:

"Although I have not yet declared my major, I have future goals I intend to achieve pertaining to the court of law and my interest in psychology. As a young African American woman, I want to push for equality with a career in Forensic Psychiatry. The field of Forensic Psychiatry is small, and not often recognized for the role it plays in the court system. Forensic Psychiatrists are hired to determine if the defendant is mentally stable to handle a trial or harsher punishment. I want to use my career to help people that, due to their mental disorders, are being charged as criminals instead of getting the psychological and medical attention they need. After having experience with family members that suffer from mental illnesses, I am familiar with the trouble they often get themselves into with the law due to their abnormal mental state. I would like to contribute my career to helping people that suffer from mental illnesses in the world, when they are unable to help themselves. These are also times when race may come into play, and defendants are not being treated equally. I want to dedicate my career to creating equity in the world. I want everyone to be to be treated and tried fairly while being provided the same opportunities for leniency. My contribution to the world, while focusing on Forensic Psychiatry is to be a force that pushes for the end of discrimination in the court system pertaining to mental illness and race. The evidence provided by a Forensic Psychiatrist in a case has great value, and my education will take me far in my efforts to change the world."

2017 Winner